The Latest: Parents: Gun-makers show 'disregard' for livesNovember 14, 2017 10:54pm

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The Latest on arguments before the Connecticut Supreme Court on whether gun-maker Remington Arms should be held liable for the Newtown school massacre (all times local):

5:45 p.m.

The parents of a child who was killed in the 2012 Newtown school massacre say they have faith the company that made the military-style rifle used in the shooting will be held responsible.

Ian Hockley and his ex-wife Nicole Hockley lost their son Dylan. They attended a Connecticut Supreme Court hearing Tuesday where attorneys argued over whether justices should overturn a lower court's dismissal of a lawsuit against Remington Arms.

The case centers on a 2005 federal law that shields gun-makers from liability in most cases.

Ian Hockley says the military provides training and mental health testing to soldiers who use rifles, but gun-makers don't make similar safety precautions when selling military-style rifles to civilians. He says the companies show a "disregard" for lives that are lost.

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12:50 p.m.

A lawyer for relatives of some Newtown school massacre victims has asked the Connecticut Supreme Court to reinstate a lawsuit against gun-maker Remington Arms, saying a rifle made by the company and used in the shooting was too dangerous to sell to the public.

The high court heard arguments Tuesday about whether justices should overturn a lower court's dismissal of the lawsuit filed by a survivor and relatives of nine people killed in the 2012 mass shooting at an elementary school. A decision isn't expected for several months.

The case centers on a Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle made by North Carolina-based Remington and a 2005 federal law that shields gun-makers from liability in most cases.

Remington's lawyer argued the federal law prohibits the lawsuit.

Twenty children and six educators were killed in the shooting.

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12:10 a.m.

The Connecticut Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on whether gun-maker Remington Arms should be held liable for the 2012 Newtown school massacre.

A hearing is scheduled for Tuesday in an appeal by a survivor and relatives of nine people killed in the shooting.

They're trying to sue Remington Arms, the North Carolina company that made the Bushmaster AR-15-style rifle used to kill 20 first-graders and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Gunman Adam Lanza's mother legally purchased the rifle.

A lower court judge dismissed the lawsuit, saying federal law shields gun-makers from most lawsuits over criminal use of their products.

The company denies the lawsuit's allegations that it violated state law by selling such a dangerous weapon to the public.

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