The Latest: Senate off to slow start on immigration debateFebruary 13, 2018 6:25pm

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Senate's immigration debate (all times local):

1:25 p.m.

The Senate is off to a slow start in this week's immigration debate with the chamber's Republican and Democratic leaders already at loggerheads on moving forward.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he wants to start the votes Tuesday afternoon.

McConnell has proposed that Republicans bring up an amendment targeting cities that don't fully cooperate with federal immigration authorities. Then, Democrats would bring up an amendment of their choosing. Amendments gaining 60 votes would become part of the immigration bill.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., has objected.

Schumer wants McConnell to bring up legislation that incorporates President Donald Trump's priorities and a second, much narrower bill from Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Chris Coons, D-Del.

The disagreement means there could be several more hours of speeches before any votes occur.

___

11:20 a.m.

Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois says Olympic gold medalist Chloe Kim's story is the story of immigration in America.

With the Senate debating immigration, Durbin is invoking the journey of Kim's father from South Korea to the United States in 1982 with a couple hundred dollars.

Durbin says Chloe Kim showed an interest in snowboarding as a young girl, developing into one of the best in the world and capturing a gold medal for the U.S. in the halfpipe Tuesday.

Durbin says Kim's family resembles many other immigrants who don't bring wealth and often don't bring a proficiency in English. He says "they only come here with a determination to make a better life for themselves and a better country for all of us."

___

8:35 a.m.

A Republican senator who introduced President Donald Trump's immigration proposal says it's "the president's framework bill or nothing."

Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas calls the bill "not an opening bid" for negotiations with Democrats on immigration but the "best and final offer."

Like the proposal Trump unveiled last month, the measure would offer a chance for citizenship for up to 1.8 million people who arrived in the U.S. as children and stayed illegally. It would provide $25 billion for border security, restrict family-based immigration, and end a visa lottery.

The Trump plan faces an uphill battle in the Senate.

___

12:13 a.m.

The Senate's Republican and Democratic leaders say it's going to be tough to broker a successful deal on immigration policy.

Debate is expected to end this week with a vote on President Donald Trump's own proposal.

The Republican majority leader, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, says Democrats need to back up their demand for action with hard work on finding a solution that Congress will pass and Trump will sign.

The Democratic leader, Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York, expressed opposition to Trump's proposal. It would pave a path to citizenship for up to 1.8 million young "Dreamer" immigrants in the U.S. illegally, a lure for Democrats. Trump also wants $25 billion for a border wall with Mexico and other security measures.

Page 1 of 1

More Stories Like This

Samuel Zeif, an 18-year-old senior at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., cries after speaking during a listening session with President Donald Trump and students and teachers in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)
Trump bucks NRA, backs raising age for buying assault rifles
Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi, right, and President Donald Trump listen as Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill speaks during a meeting with state and local officials to discuss school safety, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Trump mulls pulling immigration agents from California
A man walks into the Center for American Progress, Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018, at their office in Washington. The major liberal policy group is raising the ante on the health care debate with a new plan that builds on Medicare to guarantee coverage for all. Called “Medicare Extra for All,” the proposal to be released Feb. 22, 2018, by the Center for American Progress gives politically energized Democrats more options to achieve a long-sought goal.(AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
Leading liberal policy group unveils 'coverage for all' plan
Lawyer: Melania Trump's parents are permanent US residentsA lawyer representing first lady Melania Trump's parents says that both are living legally in the U.S. Attorney Michael Wildes says Viktor and Amalija Knavs "are both lawfully admitted to the United States as permanent residents."
Education Secretary Betsy DeVos speaks during the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC), at National Harbor, Md., Thursday, Feb. 22, 2018. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
DeVos backs expanding school choice for military children
Widow disgusted by Indiana immigration ad featuring husbandThe widow of an Uber driver killed in a suspected drunken driving crash by a person in the U.S. illegally says a political ad featuring her deceased husband is "disgusting."
AdChoices

Related Searches

Related Searches

AdChoices